1 Reply · Latest reply on Nov 24, 2017 8:10 AM by Jagarnath Behera

    Important Python GUI Frameworks

      Python, If someone learn's python at certian period they need come accorse Python GUI Frameworks while developing the application. There are lot's of Python GUI options aviable, In Python wiki on GUI programming survey over cross-platform frameworks are working under Python and a tool for cross-browser Web development based on a port of the Google Web Toolkit.

       

      Here are some ways how to choose the right Python GUI Frameworks among them, So let's get started:

       

      I started by narrowing it down to those that included all three platforms (Windows, Mac, and Linux) and, where possible, Python 3. After that filtering, I found four toolkits (Gtk, Qt, Tk, and wxWidgets) and seven frameworks (Kivy, PyQt, gui2Py, libavg, wxPython, Pyforms, and PyGOBjects).

       

       

      PyQt

       

      PyQt implements the popular Qt library, and so if you are familiar with Qt development in another language, perhaps from developing native applications for KDE or another Qt-using desktop environment, you may already be familiar with Qt. This opens up the possibility of developing applications in Python which have a familiar look and feel across many platforms, while taking advantage of the tools and knowledge of the large Qt community.

       

      PyQt is dual licensed under both a commercial and GPL license, not unlike Qt project itself, and the primary company supporting PyQt offers a license FAQ to help understand what this means for your application. For another option to use the Qt libraries with Python, consider checking out PySide, which is available under the LPGL.

       

       

      Kivy

       

      One of the more interesting projects, the liberal MIT-licensed Kivy is based on OpenGL ES 2 and includes native multi-touch for each platform and Android/iOS. It’s an event-driven framework based around a main loop, and is thus very suitable for game development. Your application adds callbacks from the main loop at a scheduled frequency, or by one-off trigger. The Kivy framework is very powerful for handling everything from widgets to animation, and includes its own language for describing user interface and interactions.

       

      If you want to create cross-platform graphical applications, or just need a very powerful cross-platform GUI, Kivy is highly recommended.

       

      Tkinter

       

      If there were a single package which might be called the "standard" GUI toolkit for Python, it would be Tkinter. Tkinter is a wrapper around Tcl/Tk, a popular graphical interface and language pairing first popularized in the early 90s. The advantage of choosing Tkinter is the vast number of resources, including books and code samples, as well as a large community of users who may be able to help you out if you have questions. Simple examples are easy to get started with and fairly human-readable.

       

      Tkinter is available under the Python license, on top of the BSD license of Tcl/Tk.

       

      WxPython

       

      WxPython brings the wxWidgets cross-platform GUI library from its native C++ to Python. WxPython is a slightly more modern approach to, which looks a little more native than Tkinter across different operating systems as it does not attempt to create its own set of widgets (although these can be themed to look much like native components). It's fairly easy to get started with as well, and has a growing developer community. You may need to bundle wxPython with your applications, as it is not automatically installed with Python.

       

      PyGUI

       

      Compared to Kivy and PyQt, PyGUI is considerably simpler and just for Unix, Macintosh and Windows platforms. Developed by Dr. Greg Ewing at the University of Canterbury in New Zealand, the MVC framework focuses on fitting into the Python ecosystem as easily as possible.

       

      One of the platform’s aims is to interpose as little code as possible between the Python application and the platform’s underlying GUI so the application’s display always reflects the native GUI of the platform. If you’re after a simple and quick way to learn GUI, start with this one.